HIPAA & Texting

Special Note: This is the first blog in a 3-part series focusing on HIPAA and patient communication. Keep checking back for upcoming blogs focusing on email and voicemail.

In recent years, a great number of medical practices have embraced text messaging as a popular means for communicating to both patients and their internal staff members. Despite the convenience and time saving benefits, healthcare providers and staff must be aware of potential consequences when texting Electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI). Text messaging includes any communication service or application that enables the transmission of electronic written messages between two or more mobile devices. This includes both Short Message Service (“SMS”) text messaging and other service providers like iMessage, WhatsApp, etc.

The Challenges

Under HIPAA healthcare providers must maintain the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all ePHI created, received, maintained, or transmitted by a covered entity. Unfortunately, text messaging presents multiple threats for meeting some of those requirements. Including:

  • Standard SMS messages are not encrypted
  • Sender does not have the ability to “control” if/when the message is discarded upon viewing
  • No clear path to verify the reader’s identity which opens the door to unintended recipients, AKA a HIPAA breach

Even well intended providers who find ways to implement and oversee texting security measures must also think about documentation. Any exchange between providers regarding a patient’s condition, must also make its way onto the patient’s medical record. Unless the provider integrates text messaging with their EMR, it can be difficult to ensure appropriate documentation.

What Does HIPAA Say?

Unfortunately the HIPAA laws and Office for Civil Rights (OCR) do not have anything specific outlined regarding texting requirements. Any and all forms of communication present some level of risk and it is the healthcare providers’ responsibility to ensure privacy and security while data is being exchanged.

Despite the lack of HIPAA specifications regarding texting, providers should keep in mind a general adherence to the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. Both have different objectives and controls for navigating the secure sending of ePHI:

  • HIPAA Privacy Rule – Limits provider disclosure of ePHI only to authorized individuals or entities.
  • HIPAA Security Rule – Requires that providers protect patient’s sensitive data from any threats to access or disclose PHI to unauthorized individuals or entities and should a breach or unauthorized disclosure occur, have a remediation plan.

Best Practices

Despite the risks, a provider can take steps to reduce the likelihood of a breach or HIPAA violation while utilizing text messaging. When texting any sensitive ePHI information that might be locally stored in a device, encryption should be applied in the event of a loss, disposal or theft. Additionally, the text might be stored at the server level (phone carrier).

The following safeguards can help protect PHI along with establishing compliant communication:

Security Risk Analysis (SRA) – While conducting an SRA, a healthcare provider will identify where ePHI is created, received, maintained, and transmitted. For texts, ePHI will primarily be created, received, and maintained on mobile phones.

Limit PHI – Whenever possible it is best to text with limited or no PHI included in the message, examples: appointment confirmations, instructions to call the office to receive test results, etc.

Policies and Procedures – Ensure texting is included in the policies and procedures, specifically Administrative and Technical policies. It is important to outline what is acceptable to text along with an outline of steps should a text be sent to the wrong patient/incorrect recipient.

Workforce Training – A well trained workforce is any healthcare provider’s best defense against undisclosed PHI exposure. Workforce training should include the sharing of information, securing authorized devices and using secure third party apps that might permit sharing information in a secure way.

Waivers and Intake Forms – Ensure all patient forms are up-to-date with all the current HIPAA requirements. The forms should plainly state which methods the patient allows the provider to contact him/her. Additionally, forms should include who outside the patient can receive their information and what can be sent.

Notice of Privacy Practice – A Notice of Privacy should be standard operating procedure for providers and distributed to all patients. If the provider has included text messaging as part of their communication model, ensure the Notice of Privacy includes texting.

Next Steps

Get started texting in a more compliant manner and take steps to build a HIPAA baseline by tackling the mandatory requirement of an SRA. Need assistance with your risk analysis or creating/updating Policies and Procedures templates? Contact Us today.

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